los angeles branding photographer

2018 in Review—A Badass Year for Brand Photography

"Why are you so expensive"

It's a question that creatives get ALL THE TIME: “Why are you so expensive?”



It's not a question we love.



It's a question that feels, well, a little insulting.



So... what's the best answer?


CourtneyPaigeRay_EmmaFeil-8.jpg

The myth of "expensive"


Here's the thing about being expensive: It's a myth.



Our prices aren't just based on cost of materials, overhead, tools, etc. It's what we create from those tools that makes us unique. Our work has a special signature that only we can add.



The creative magic that we bring to the table? It can't be replicated. THAT is where our prices are determined.



If your clients understand that value, then nothing becomes too expensive if it addresses exactly what they need.



But how do you communicate that to your clients? They've seen your stunning work, your website, your Insta, your lead magnet, your live videos—what else could there be?



The answer is simple. Really, really simple.

How to respond, every time

Here’s my answer when someone tells me I’m expensive. I want you to practice this phrase over and over until it rolls off your tongue easily. It’s the only answer you need to give when someone questions your pricing:

Good work costs good money.

And I’m very good at what I do.


Need some help with this? Get in touch; I offer 1:1 mentoring sessions for photographers to help you grow your business and refine your process. Email hello@courtneypaigeray.com to find out more.

My Biggest Risk (And Reward)

CourtneyPaigeRay_EmmaFeil-3.jpg

Three years ago, I froze. I was finalizing my divorce, healing from health issues caused by a bad reaction to an IUD that followed a miscarriage, and struggling to turn my fledgling business into a suddenly-profitable, money-making machine. Did I mention I had about two months of fiscal runway to get there before the joint checking was closed? It was one of the most stressful times in my life. I had a panic attack about, oh, every other day. My hair was falling out and I gained weight. I barely slept. There was no room for failure.

On the outside though, I was totally fine.

“Hey!” I spun my story, “The divorce is friendly, I get to focus on my work and I’m learning how to heal my body! All good!”

That was true—the divorce WAS friendly. So friendly that many of our mutual friends thought I was totally OK. And I was too embarrassed about having so many feelings to reach out; I DID get to focus on my work... all day. And all night. And on the weekends. And it crept into my dreams, when I was able to sleep long enough to have them. I couldn’t turn it off because the next rent check was always due soon; I WAS learning how to heal my body, and I still am. I felt like a tourist in my own body, it just didn’t feel right. Now I know how out of balance I was. There were a lot of tears and confusion on how to get better. And it was never as fast as I wanted it to be. SO, with all this on my plate, I froze.

I stopped taking creative risks because I couldn’t afford them. I only made safe business decisions that would guarantee food on my table. If I had only known then how wrong I was... that I should’ve taken a very calculated BIG risk, the same one I finally took six months ago. What was it?

For the first four years of my photography business, I did nearly everything: weddings, events, family, bloggers and, of course, branding. I wanted to be the expert at everything—the kind of photographer that everyone wanted to use.

That was a huge mistake. I was good at everything, but an expert at nothing. I wasn't top-of-mind when it came to choosing a photographer—I was somewhere in the middle. "Oh yeah, Courtney, I think she can do that." was the general thought. And though I was always a good photographer—professional yet fun, made beautiful photos and delivered them early for my clients—I was just one of many who did exactly that. 

At the beginning of this year, I'd had enough of hovering around the middle. I wanted to be the first thought that people had when it came to choosing a photographer. So I dropped every single type of photography from my menu of services except for ONE: Branding.

I went all-in on being a branding photographer for female creative entrepreneurs. I niched down to a small group, and I focused all my marketing efforts on them. I blogged and IG posted and FB posted and emailed and live video-ed, and everytime I used my platform, I was talking about how to create a strong brand for creative entrepreneurs through visual storytelling. 

That's a pretty specific audience, huh? It seems like I'd quickly run out of material, but an interesting thing happened. The more I niched down, the more I found to talk about. Interest and engagement from my audience grew rapidly. My calendar started to fill up with photo shoots. I'm starting to hear from clients, "I've been following your work, and you're the first person who came to mind for my branding photos."

Here's the mistake I was making: I was too broad in the services I offered. If you're at the same place in your business, I recommend taking a moment to examine the type of work that really fills your cup. I noticed that at the end of branding shoots, I felt energized and excited. I was inspired by collaborating with my branding clients. We made some killer art together! Over time, it became clear what type of work made me the happiest.

Recently, I sat down for coffee with a friend and business connection that I'd met at a networking event. Thought there were multiple photographers at the event, she said she was drawn to my work because I was so clear and focused when it came to talking about what type of photography I do: Branding. All day, every day.

My advice: Get specific, and don't be afraid to niche down. Your audience wants to know what you're an expert at and how it can benefit them. You need focus in order to grow. 

Bossladies Magazine Work Sesh

I talk about this a lot, but with good reason: Los Angeles is a hot spot of creativity right now, and women are starting businesses like whoa. We're all inspired, driven, ambitious, and ready to support each other. The woman at Bossladies Magazine work sesh inspire me to grow and go go go with my work. 

One day, after work sash, I sat back and thought about what life would look like 10, 20, 30 years from now. I realized that I'd want to look back at where it all started, who I was growing with, the community that started it all. And I knew I needed to document these meetings of the minds. The is a set from the March 2018 work sesh of Bossladies, and I always encourage women new to business to attend. We need each other to lean on, to inspire, to collaborate, to laugh and to hug.